If all good things must come to an end, then it had to happen sooner or later. After 7 years and nearly 400 tips, DIY projects, yarns, and wordy expressions of opinion, we have decided to end our Monday posts and shut down the website. We will still be sharing tips and great information on our facebook page, and pictures of both the practical and eye candy variety on Instagram. So as we and technology move along, please move with us and like and follow us at either or both of those locations. And as always, feel free to swing by and say hi when you share an anchorage with Eurisko. Thanks for all the support. See you out there.

Compass Cover

June 19, 2017

If all good things must come to an end, then it had to happen sooner or later. After 7 years and nearly 400 tips, DIY projects, yarns, and wordy expressions of opinion, we have decided to end our Monday posts and shut down the website. We will still be sharing tips and great information on our facebook page, and pictures of both the practical and eye candy variety on Instagram. So as we and technology move along, please move with us and like and follow us at either or both of those locations. And as always, feel free to swing by and say hi when you share an anchorage with Eurisko. Thanks for all the support. See you out there.

Sunlight is detrimental to the longevity of your compass. The liquid becomes cloudy and the heading nearly unreadable. Most new compasses are sold with a plastic cover to shield them from the effects of the sun, and most of us either use this cover, a hat or some other nearby object when the boat is at rest. But there are times, even when you're not sailing, that being able to see your "heading" is important.


Protect your compass from the sun.

When we are at anchor, we always cover our new compass with the supplied cover. But in unfamiliar anchorages, we found that we were continually taking it off in order to verify what direction we were facing, where the forecasted wind would be from, if we would still be in the lee when the wind arrived, and (sometimes most importantly) what would be behind us in that wind. After removing the cover and then forgetting to put it back on a few times, Dave came to a compromise. Yes, we need to shield the liquid from direct sunlight, but we also need to know what direction we are facing, so he cut a small slit in the front of the cover. Most of the compass is still protected; only a small area is exposed, just enough for us to see our heading. This small slit allows us to check at a glance our relative position to forecasted winds yet still protects our new compass.

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Connie McBride's work has been published in Good Old Boat, Sail Magazine, Small Craft Advisor, Cruising World, All at Sea, and Blue Water Sailing. As a full-time liveaboard cruiser for over 15 years, she has written several books and in her spare time, well, who has spare time?

It's here! My latest book, Years of Ideas from a Simple Sailor is now available on Amazon.

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